Elementary School Program Samples

The curriculum samples shown here represent critical topics we address at each grade level.

2nd Grade 

Place Value

  • Count by 10s, 100s, and 1,000s.
  • Say, "23 ones is the same as 2 tens and 3 ones," for all whole numbers to 1,000.
  • Identify ones, tens, hundreds, and thousands place.
  • Read and write whole numbers up to 1,000 in standard form.
  • Rounding off: "Is 271 closer to 200 or to 300?" for appropriate numbers.
  • "How many 10s are there in 120?"

Proportional Thinking

  • "If two pieces of candy cost five cents, how much will six pieces of candy cost?"
  • "Recyclers pay 5¢ for every 2 cans. How many cans are needed to get 25¢? How much are 8 cans worth?"

Algorithm for Subtraction of Whole Numbers

  • One–digit number minus one–digit number, column and vertical format
  • Up to three–digit number minus three–digit number, with and without "borrowing" ("regrouping," "trading"), column format

3rd Grade

Counting

  • Count by 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 15, 20, 25, and 50 (first 13 multiples of each number starting at 0).
  • Count by 6, 7, 8, 9, 12 (first 13 multiples of each number starting at 0).
  • Count by 15, 20, 25, and 50 (first 13 multiples of each number).
  • Count by 1/2s, 1/4s, 1/3s, 11/2s, 21/2s.
  • "How many 20s/25s/50s are there in 200?"
  • "How many 11/2s are there in 6? How many 21/2s are there in 71/2?" for appropriate numbers

Subtraction Facts for Whole Numbers

  • Single–digit minus single–digit, positive answer
  • Double–digit minus single–digit, difference equal to or greater than 10
  • Double–digit minus single–digit, difference less than 10
  • "15 minus what number is 9?" for numbers up to 20
  • Explain the concept and use of fact families in subtraction.
  • Subtract 10 from any number up to 1,000.
  • A multiple of 10 minus a double–digit number (30 – 14; 70 – 26) mentally
  • Single–digit minus single–digit, negative answer

Fraction Concepts

  • Tell whether a given proper fraction is greater than, less than, or equal to 1/2.
  • Tell whether a given proper or improper fraction is greater than, less than, or equal to one whole (1).
  • Explain why 1/2 and 2/4 are the same amount and draw pictures demonstrating knowledge of equivalent fractions in general.
  • Draw and interpret pictures of given proper and improper fractions and mixed numbers.

Proportional Thinking

  • "If three candies cost 25¢, how many candies can you buy for $1.00?"
  • "If three candies cost 25¢, how much does it cost to buy a total of 18 candies?"

4th Grade

Rounding off

  • Round off any whole number to any place up to millions.
  • "Is 15/8 closer to 1 or to 2?" for appropriate numbers
  • "Is 2.07 closer to 2 or to 3?" for appropriate numbers

Find the missing numbers ... (seeing patterns)

  • 1, 2, 4, 7, 11, ___, ___, ___
  • 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, ___, ___, ___
  • 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, ___, ___, ___

Problem Solving

  • State and understand that:
    • "The whole is equal to the sum of its parts."
    • "Any part equals the whole minus the other parts."
  • Solve two- and three-step word problems using two or more operations.
  • Use various techniques in problem solving:
    • Break down the problem into simpler parts.
    • Apply the "easier number" method.
    • Draw a picture.
    • Use mental math.
  • Check answer for reasonableness.

5th Grade

  • Proportional Thinking
  • "On a certain map, 3 inches represents 500 miles. How many miles does 18 inches represent?"

Ordering

  • Arrange a group of whole numbers from 0 to 1,000 in order.
  • Arrange a group of fractions containing 0, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 3/4, 5/8, 3/8, 9/10.
  • Arrange a group of decimal fractions containing 0.3, 1, 0, 0.09, 1.2, 0.67.

Common Fraction Concepts

  • Find least common multiple (LCM).
  • Find greatest common factor (GCF).
  • Reduce fractions to lowest terms.
  • Rewrite improper fractions as mixed numbers.
  • Rewrite mixed numbers as improper fractions.