Mathnasium 1153 Route 3 North, #120, Crofton MD 21054 (301) 776-6284   crofton@mathnasium.com

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Events

Mathnasium of Crofton STEM Events

and

Math Summer Camps 

 

 Our center staff and kids participated in STEM events and  collaborated with MD STEM organization. Kids enjoyed the event by doing  many STEM activities. parents and childern partcicpated from Odenton,Severn, Millersville,Glenburnie Elementary/Middle Schools. following activities in addition to many more STEM activities were performed by childern with the help of our staff.

Math: Pipe Cleaner Counting

For the student or child just learning to count, understanding that numbers increase in size can be confusing. With just pipe cleaners and beads, you can help your child learn to count while also getting a visual of how numbers increase in size. Simply take small pieces of paper and label each pipe cleaner with a number. Then, have your child order the pipe cleaners from smallest to greatest and start stringing on the correct number of beads while counting aloud.

Technology: Stop-Motion Animation Video

Here’s an excellent option for creative STEM learning. We’ve all seen the fun stop-motion videos online, but you probably never thought of creating one yourself or, better yet, with your kids. With just a few objects, a smartphone or iPad® and a stop-motion app, your kids can learn about the technology behind movie-making and create a video unique to their own likes and interests.

Science:Magnetic Slime

Homemade “slime” activities are a staple for many parents and educators looking for a fun tactile activity. This variant adds a splash of science by adding iron oxide powder and magnets into the mix. Getting the slime consistency right can be a little tricky, but most issues can be resolved with either adding more glue or more liquid starch. Once the starch is ready, you’ll need a strong neodymium magnet (or more) to start manipulating the slime.

This activity is an excellent conversation starter as kids are sure to have a lot of questions about how magnets work—so don’t forget to brush up on the subject yourself before getting started! 

Engineering:Jellybean Building

All you’ll need is a pile of jellybeans (or large marshmallows) and toothpicks for your student or child to start learning about structures. By connecting toothpicks with jellybeans, encourage your child to see which shapes hold together well, which shapes stack well and which shapes are most interesting to look at.

This activity can help them start to understand the thought, design and technology behind structural engineering. Try challenging them to create a house or a specific structure—it’s a blast to see them considering their options as they build.